Lumbar Spondylolisthesis - Dr. Ronjon Paul

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis is characterized by instability in the vertebral column, most commonly in the region of the L4-L5 vertebrae. The origin of the name is Greek, with “spondy” referring to vertebrae and “listhesis” referring to movement.

About Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis is characterized by instability in the vertebral column, most commonly in the region of the L4-L5 vertebrae. The origin of the name is Greek, with “spondy” referring to vertebrae and “listhesis” referring to movement.

Shifting vertebrae push on the spinal cord and can cause pain and numbness, especially when standing or bending over. Nonsurgical treatment options exist, and strengthening the muscles of the core can help compensate for the vertebral instability, but a number of more invasive procedures can be performed in more difficult cases.

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About Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis is characterized by instability in the vertebral column, most commonly in the region of the L4-L5 vertebrae. The origin of the name is Greek, with “spondy” referring to vertebrae and “listhesis” referring to movement.

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Shifting vertebrae push on the spinal cord and can cause pain and numbness, especially when standing or bending over. Nonsurgical treatment options exist, and strengthening the muscles of the core can help compensate for the vertebral instability, but a number of more invasive procedures can be performed in more difficult cases.

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LOWER BACK AND/OR LEG PAIN

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ABNORMAL POSTURE AND/OR A SHUFFLING GAIT WHEN WALKING

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WEAKNESS IN THE LOWER EXTREMITIES

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SCIATICA, AN ACHING PAIN IN THE HIPS, BUTTOCKS, AND LOWER BACK THAT RADIATES (SPREADS) INTO THE BACK OF THE THIGHS AND LEGS

Lumbar SpondylolisthesisBy the numbers

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patients treated per year
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treated non-operatively

Lumbar SpondylolisthesisBy the numbers

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patients treated per year
0123456789001234567890%
treated non-operatively
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/spondylolisthesis-condition-animation-high.gif

How is Lumbar Spondylolisthesis managed?

Non-surgical management of lumbar spondylolisthesis will typically involve over the counter anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications such as NSAIDs, as well as physical therapy. Improving core strength has excellent effects on back pain, and lifestyle modifications may improve quality of life significantly. Steroid injections may also be performed to provide long term relief, however, are not recommended in patients for whom relief does not last for several months.

In patients unable to achieve satisfactory results with non-surgical options, decompression surgery with or without fusion will typically be performed. Decompression involves removing part of the bone and disc to improve the space within the spinal canal, and fusion may be necessary to then stabilize the vertebral column. Bone grafts are typically used to facilitate the fusion of vertebrae. These grafts may come from the patient themself, a cadaver donor, or a synthetic source depending on patient preference. Most patients will be up and walking the day after surgery, but three to six months are recommended before returning to all normal activities.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/spondylolisthesis-condition-animation-high.gif

How is Lumbar Spondylolisthesis managed?

Non-surgical management of lumbar spondylolisthesis will typically involve over the counter anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications such as NSAIDs, as well as physical therapy. Improving core strength has excellent effects on back pain, and lifestyle modifications may improve quality of life significantly. Steroid injections may also be performed to provide long term relief, however, are not recommended in patients for whom relief does not last for several months.

In patients unable to achieve satisfactory results with non-surgical options, decompression surgery with or without fusion will typically be performed. Decompression involves removing part of the bone and disc to improve the space within the spinal canal, and fusion may be necessary to then stabilize the vertebral column. Bone grafts are typically used to facilitate the fusion of vertebrae. These grafts may come from the patient themself, a cadaver donor, or a synthetic source depending on patient preference. Most patients will be up and walking the day after surgery, but three to six months are recommended before returning to all normal activities.

How is Lumbar Spondylolisthesis diagnosed?

In less severe cases, physical examination and patient history are usually enough to make a tentative diagnosis. In more severe cases, however, imaging will often be necessary to evaluate the structures of the back, especially if considering surgery as an option. X-rays can provide rapid and clear visualization, but MRI and CT are sometimes ordered for a more detailed look into the nature of the condition for a given patient.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg

How is Lumbar Spondylolisthesis diagnosed?

In less severe cases, physical examination and patient history are usually enough to make a tentative diagnosis. In more severe cases, however, imaging will often be necessary to evaluate the structures of the back, especially if considering surgery as an option. X-rays can provide rapid and clear visualization, but MRI and CT are sometimes ordered for a more detailed look into the nature of the condition for a given patient.

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Disclosures & Important Information

Disclaimer
The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

Disclosures & Important Information

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

DAY OF SURGERY INFORMATION

Edwards Hospital

Arrival & Directions

Drive to the South parking garage. Free Valet parking is available during business hours. If you self-park, take the elevator from the garage to the first floor to enter the main hospital lobby. Wheelchairs are available if needed. Take the D elevator to the 2nd floor. Proceed to the Surgical and Endoscopy Check-In Desk. Here you and your family will be checked in and escorted to the Pre-op Area to be prepared for surgery. Up to two family members may wait with you until you are taken to surgery. Your family may then wait in the Surgical Waiting room until notified by the surgeon that the surgery has been completed. A receptionist will take down contact information so that your family may be easily reached to speak with Dr. Paul. Complimentary coffee is available for your family while in the Surgical Waiting room. The cafeteria and gift shop are on the ground floor in the North area of the hospital and the coffee shop is in the South area of the hospital for your family’s convenience.

Get Directions to Edwards Hospital

In the preoperative room you will be prepared for surgery. The team will be checking your vital signs, starting your IV, validating your medications, health history, lab results and any follow up for additional testing needed. At this time, they will obtain your consent for surgery and answer any questions you may still have. Your anesthesiologist will see you and your family prior to your surgery. Dr. Paul, Adam or Kevin  will mark your surgical site. You will be escorted to the operating room by cart. Your family can wait in the surgical waiting room. Dr. Paul will call them when surgery is completed.  If he can not reach them, he will leave a message with the Patient Liaison. Following surgery you will be taken to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will recover for an hour or more. During this time, pain and nausea control will be established and your vital signs will be monitored frequently.