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Lumbar (Lower Back) Conditions

Several structures in the lumbar spine can cause lower back pain, including the nerve roots that exit the spine, facet joints, intervertebral discs, vertebral bones, and the spinal muscles. Many lumbar spinal conditions are also interrelated. Explore Lumbar Spine Conditions Below.

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Lumbar Herniated Disc

A herniated disc may be caused by simple wear and tear from repeated movement over time or disc degeneration. During the natural aging process, spinal discs lose some of their water content making it difficult to support the load from above vertebrae.

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Lumbar Herniated Disc

A herniated disc may be caused by simple wear and tear from repeated movement over time or disc degeneration. During the natural aging process, spinal discs lose some of their water content making it difficult to support the load from above vertebrae.

Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

Lumbar degenerative disc disease is a common experience in which one or more intervertebral discs cushioning the vertebra is damaged and bulges out of its usual location. “Disease” may be a misnomer since most people have some degree of degeneration in their discs. This bulging increases local pressure and the damaged tissue releases inflammatory mediators to the surrounding area.

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Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

Lumbar degenerative disc disease is a common experience in which one or more intervertebral discs cushioning the vertebra is damaged and bulges out of its usual location. “Disease” may be a misnomer since most people have some degree of degeneration in their discs. This bulging increases local pressure and the damaged tissue releases inflammatory mediators to the surrounding area.

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Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Stenotic lumbar vertebrae compress the spinal cord and nerve roots traveling through them. In the lumbar region, this translates to a progressive loss of function of the lower extremities, as well as potentially affecting other bodily functions such as urination. The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors.

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Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Stenotic lumbar vertebrae compress the spinal cord and nerve roots traveling through them. In the lumbar region, this translates to a progressive loss of function of the lower extremities, as well as potentially affecting other bodily functions such as urination. The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors.

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis is characterized by instability in the vertebral column, most commonly in the region of the L4-L5 vertebrae. The origin of the name is Greek, with “spondy” referring to vertebrae and “listhesis” referring to movement. Shifting vertebrae push on the spinal cord and can cause pain and numbness, especially when standing or bending over.

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Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

Lumbar Spondylolisthesis is characterized by instability in the vertebral column, most commonly in the region of the L4-L5 vertebrae. The origin of the name is Greek, with “spondy” referring to vertebrae and “listhesis” referring to movement. Shifting vertebrae push on the spinal cord and can cause pain and numbness, especially when standing or bending over.

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Acute Low Back Pain

Acute low back pain typically develops after a strenuous or jarring event, but may also present without any clearly related activity. An acute episode lasts for up to six weeks in patients without a history of complaints to the affected region, and symptoms can vary significantly between patients. The pain can be diffuse or focal and can feel like burning, a sharp discomfort, or a dull ache.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-sections-of-the-spine-lower.jpg

Acute Low Back Pain

Acute low back pain typically develops after a strenuous or jarring event, but may also present without any clearly related activity. An acute episode lasts for up to six weeks in patients without a history of complaints to the affected region, and symptoms can vary significantly between patients. The pain can be diffuse or focal and can feel like burning, a sharp discomfort, or a dull ache.

Chronic Low Back Pain

Chronic Lower Back Pain is another common condition defined by affecting the lumbar region for three months or longer. Pain ranges in form and severity, and stems from anomalies in the anatomical structure of the back. Causative factors may include stress, trauma, or concomitant disease, but in many cases may be difficult to isolate.

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https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-osteoarthritis-image.jpg

Chronic Low Back Pain

Chronic Lower Back Pain is another common condition defined by affecting the lumbar region for three months or longer. Pain ranges in form and severity, and stems from anomalies in the anatomical structure of the back. Causative factors may include stress, trauma, or concomitant disease, but in many cases may be difficult to isolate.

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SI Joint Pain

SI Joint Pain occurs when the joints connecting the portion of the spine below the lumbar, the sacrum, and the iliac crest of the pelvis are affected. This pain can mimic sciatica, but involves abnormal stress on the joint rather than the sciatic nerve. Normally a fairly immobile joint, excessive strain can irritate this region of the spine causing paint.

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SI Joint Pain

SI Joint Pain occurs when the joints connecting the portion of the spine below the lumbar, the sacrum, and the iliac crest of the pelvis are affected. This pain can mimic sciatica, but involves abnormal stress on the joint rather than the sciatic nerve. Normally a fairly immobile joint, excessive strain can irritate this region of the spine causing paint.

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Disclaimer
The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

Disclosures & Important Information

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

DAY OF SURGERY INFORMATION

Edwards Hospital

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Drive to the South parking garage. Free Valet parking is available during business hours. If you self-park, take the elevator from the garage to the first floor to enter the main hospital lobby. Wheelchairs are available if needed. Take the D elevator to the 2nd floor. Proceed to the Surgical and Endoscopy Check-In Desk. Here you and your family will be checked in and escorted to the Pre-op Area to be prepared for surgery. Up to two family members may wait with you until you are taken to surgery. Your family may then wait in the Surgical Waiting room until notified by the surgeon that the surgery has been completed. A receptionist will take down contact information so that your family may be easily reached to speak with Dr. Paul. Complimentary coffee is available for your family while in the Surgical Waiting room. The cafeteria and gift shop are on the ground floor in the North area of the hospital and the coffee shop is in the South area of the hospital for your family’s convenience.

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In the preoperative room you will be prepared for surgery. The team will be checking your vital signs, starting your IV, validating your medications, health history, lab results and any follow up for additional testing needed. At this time, they will obtain your consent for surgery and answer any questions you may still have. Your anesthesiologist will see you and your family prior to your surgery. Dr. Paul, Adam or Kevin  will mark your surgical site. You will be escorted to the operating room by cart. Your family can wait in the surgical waiting room. Dr. Paul will call them when surgery is completed.  If he can not reach them, he will leave a message with the Patient Liaison. Following surgery you will be taken to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will recover for an hour or more. During this time, pain and nausea control will be established and your vital signs will be monitored frequently.