Lumbar Spinal Stenosis - Dr. Ronjon Paul

Stenotic lumbar vertebrae compress the spinal cord and nerve roots traveling through them. In the lumbar region, this translates to a progressive loss of function of the lower extremities, as well as potentially affecting other bodily functions such as urination.

About Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Stenotic lumbar vertebrae compress the spinal cord and nerve roots traveling through them. In the lumbar region, this translates to a progressive loss of function of the lower extremities, as well as potentially affecting other bodily functions such as urination. The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors. Unfortunately, these mediators lead to inflammation and further compression, which can lead to permanent damage to the nerves if left untreated.

The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors. Unfortunately, these mediators lead to inflammation and further compression, which can lead to permanent damage to the nerves if left untreated.

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About Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Stenotic lumbar vertebrae compress the spinal cord and nerve roots traveling through them. In the lumbar region, this translates to a progressive loss of function of the lower extremities, as well as potentially affecting other bodily functions such as urination. The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors. Unfortunately, these mediators lead to inflammation and further compression, which can lead to permanent damage to the nerves if left untreated.

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https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png
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The cause of compression can vary, but is often a result of bulges in the intervertebral discs cushioning the connections of the vertebral column. These bulging discs compress nearby structures, and damaged tissues will release inflammatory mediators in an attempt to recruit healing factors. Unfortunately, these mediators lead to inflammation and further compression, which can lead to permanent damage to the nerves if left untreated.

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DECREASED ENDURANCE DURING PHYSICAL EXERCISE AND ACTIVITIES

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WEAKNESS AND/OR LOSS OF BALANCE

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NUMBNESS OR A “PRICKLY” FEELING IN YOUR LEGS, CALVES, OR BUTTOCKS

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SYMPTOMS IMPROVE WHEN YOU SIT, LEAN FORWARD, LIE ON YOUR BACK, OR SIT WITH YOUR FEET RAISED

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ACHING, DULL BACK PAIN RADIATING (SPREADING) TO YOUR LEGS

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NEUROGENIC CLAUDICATION

Lumbar Spinal StenosisBy the numbers

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patients treated per year by Dr. Paul’s practice
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treated non operatively

Lumbar Spinal StenosisBy the numbers

01234567890,012345678900123456789001234567890+
patients treated per year by Dr. Paul’s practice
0123456789001234567890%
treated non operatively
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-spinal-stenosis.jpg

Can Lumbar Spinal Stenosis be dangerous?

In most cases, there is little serious risk involved in lumbar stenosis, but long-standing and untreated conditions may progress to permanent disability. If only the lower extremities are involved, then cause for less concern. If bowel or bladder problems occur, however, prompt medical evaluation is highly recommended.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-spinal-stenosis.jpg

Can Lumbar Spinal Stenosis be dangerous?

In most cases, there is little serious risk involved in lumbar stenosis, but long-standing and untreated conditions may progress to permanent disability. If only the lower extremities are involved, then cause for less concern. If bowel or bladder problems occur, however, prompt medical evaluation is highly recommended.

How is Lumbar Spinal Stenosis managed?

In the management of lumbar spinal stenosis, both surgical and non-surgical options exist, and generally the non-surgical ones will be exhausted prior to surgery. Over the counter medications for pain and inflammation, as well as physical therapy and spinal injections can all serve to reduce pain and progression of the disease. In patients for whom this treatment is inadequate, surgery may be recommended. The goal of surgery is primarily to reduce pain in the legs and resolve bowel or bladder problems, and is less reliable for reducing pain in the back. Most patients are able to resume all normal activities in six to nine months after surgery.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-spinal-stenosis-condition-animation-high.gif
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-spinal-stenosis-condition-animation-high.gif

How is Lumbar Spinal Stenosis managed?

In the management of lumbar spinal stenosis, both surgical and non-surgical options exist, and generally the non-surgical ones will be exhausted prior to surgery. Over the counter medications for pain and inflammation, as well as physical therapy and spinal injections can all serve to reduce pain and progression of the disease. In patients for whom this treatment is inadequate, surgery may be recommended. The goal of surgery is primarily to reduce pain in the legs and resolve bowel or bladder problems, and is less reliable for reducing pain in the back. Most patients are able to resume all normal activities in six to nine months after surgery.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg

How is Lumbar Spinal Stenosis diagnosed?

Physical examination and patient history will be performed, along with possible neurologic evaluation for nerve function in the lower extremities. X-rays, MRI, and contrast CT are all excellent options for visualizing the structures of the back in greater detail to assess the problematic areas, and may be ordered in the course of diagnosis.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg

How is Lumbar Spinal Stenosis diagnosed?

Physical examination and patient history will be performed, along with possible neurologic evaluation for nerve function in the lower extremities. X-rays, MRI, and contrast CT are all excellent options for visualizing the structures of the back in greater detail to assess the problematic areas, and may be ordered in the course of diagnosis.

How can we help you?

How can we help you?

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Disclosures & Important Information

Disclaimer
The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

Disclosures & Important Information

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

DAY OF SURGERY INFORMATION

Edwards Hospital

Arrival & Directions

Drive to the South parking garage. Free Valet parking is available during business hours. If you self-park, take the elevator from the garage to the first floor to enter the main hospital lobby. Wheelchairs are available if needed. Take the D elevator to the 2nd floor. Proceed to the Surgical and Endoscopy Check-In Desk. Here you and your family will be checked in and escorted to the Pre-op Area to be prepared for surgery. Up to two family members may wait with you until you are taken to surgery. Your family may then wait in the Surgical Waiting room until notified by the surgeon that the surgery has been completed. A receptionist will take down contact information so that your family may be easily reached to speak with Dr. Paul. Complimentary coffee is available for your family while in the Surgical Waiting room. The cafeteria and gift shop are on the ground floor in the North area of the hospital and the coffee shop is in the South area of the hospital for your family’s convenience.

Get Directions to Edwards Hospital

In the preoperative room you will be prepared for surgery. The team will be checking your vital signs, starting your IV, validating your medications, health history, lab results and any follow up for additional testing needed. At this time, they will obtain your consent for surgery and answer any questions you may still have. Your anesthesiologist will see you and your family prior to your surgery. Dr. Paul, Adam or Kevin  will mark your surgical site. You will be escorted to the operating room by cart. Your family can wait in the surgical waiting room. Dr. Paul will call them when surgery is completed.  If he can not reach them, he will leave a message with the Patient Liaison. Following surgery you will be taken to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will recover for an hour or more. During this time, pain and nausea control will be established and your vital signs will be monitored frequently.