Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease - Dr. Ronjon Paul

Lumbar degenerative disc disease is a common experience in which one or more intervertebral discs cushioning the vertebra is damaged and bulges out of its usual location. “Disease” may be a misnomer since most people have some degree of degeneration in their discs.

About Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

Lumbar degenerative disc disease is a common experience in which one or more intervertebral discs cushioning the vertebra is damaged and bulges out of its usual location. “Disease” may be a misnomer since most people have some degree of degeneration in their discs. This bulging increases local pressure and the damaged tissue releases inflammatory mediators to the surrounding area.

Naturally, these discs lose elasticity and generally deteriorate with age, leading to a degenerative syndrome of the intervertebral discs. Bulging of these discs compresses nerve roots traveling through the narrow passages between vertebra to distal structures, and will cause pain in the compressed nerve locations and towards their respective destinations.

powered by

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png

About Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

Lumbar degenerative disc disease is a common experience in which one or more intervertebral discs cushioning the vertebra is damaged and bulges out of its usual location. “Disease” may be a misnomer since most people have some degree of degeneration in their discs. This bulging increases local pressure and the damaged tissue releases inflammatory mediators to the surrounding area.

powered by

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png

Naturally, these discs lose elasticity and generally deteriorate with age, leading to a degenerative syndrome of the intervertebral discs. Bulging of these discs compresses nerve roots traveling through the narrow passages between vertebra to distal structures, and will cause pain in the compressed nerve locations and towards their respective destinations.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/condition-icons-bending.png

PAIN AT THE SITE OF THE INJURY

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/condition-icons-tingling-or-numbess.png

PAIN, NUMBNESS, OR TINGLING IN THE ARMS OR LEGS

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/condition-icons-pain-at-site.png

PAIN IS WORSE WHEN BENDING, TWISTING, AND/OR SITTING

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/condition-icons-lying-down.png

LYING DOWN RELIEVES PRESSURE ON THE SPINE

Lumbar Degenerative Disc DiseaseBy the numbers

0123456789001234567890%
adults report experiencing low back pain
012345678900123456789001234567890M
lost work days to low back pain every year
0123456789001234567890%
of population will experience back pain in life
01234567890
related minimally invasive treatments offered by Dr. Paul

Lumbar Degenerative Disc DiseaseBy the numbers

0123456789001234567890%
adults report experiencing low back pain
012345678900123456789001234567890M
lost work days to low back pain every year
0123456789001234567890%
of population will experience back pain in life
01234567890
related minimally invasive treatments offered by Dr. Paul
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-degenerative-disc-disease-condition-animation-high-1.gif

How is Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease managed?

The management of lumbar degenerative disc disease primarily involves limiting the symptomatic presentation. Degenerative disc disease is not a dangerous illness, but neither is it curable. A combination of physical therapy, pain medication, and lifestyle changes will usually be necessary to achieve optimal relief.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/lumbar-degenerative-disc-disease-condition-animation-high-1.gif

How is Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease managed?

The management of lumbar degenerative disc disease primarily involves limiting the symptomatic presentation. Degenerative disc disease is not a dangerous illness, but neither is it curable. A combination of physical therapy, pain medication, and lifestyle changes will usually be necessary to achieve optimal relief.

How is Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease diagnosed?

Your doctor will likely order an x-ray to get a better view of your back, but a CT or MRI scan may be required for better visualization.

Your provider will need to order your doctor will likely order an x-ray to get a better view of your back, but a CT scan may be required for better visualization. The intervertebral discs show up relatively poorly on x-ray, but CT allows for the visualization of cracks in the bone and slippage.

https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/dr-ronjon-paul-md-1020x681px-how-is-condition-diagnosed.jpg

How is Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease diagnosed?

Your doctor will likely order an x-ray to get a better view of your back, but a CT or MRI scan may be required for better visualization.

Your provider will need to order your doctor will likely order an x-ray to get a better view of your back, but a CT scan may be required for better visualization. The intervertebral discs show up relatively poorly on x-ray, but CT allows for the visualization of cracks in the bone and slippage.

How can we help you?

How can we help you?

Educational Support Powered By
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png
https://paulspine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/nuvasive.png
Disclosures & Important Information

Disclaimer
The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

Disclosures & Important Information

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. Dr. Paul makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of information contained on or available through this web site, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this website with other sources, and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON OR ACCESSED THROUGH THIS WEB SITE.

Dr. Paul does not recommend, endorse or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any specific tests, products, procedures, treatments, services, opinions, health care providers or other information that may be contained on or available through this web site. DR. PAUL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE NOR LIABLE FOR ANY ADVICE, COURSE OF TREATMENT, DIAGNOSIS OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION, SERVICES OR PRODUCTS THAT YOU OBTAIN THROUGH THIS WEB SITE. www.paulspine.com/legal/disclaimer.

Individuals’ outcomes may depend on a number of factors, including but not limited to patient characteristics, disease characteristics and/or surgeon experience.

All logos and names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Privacy Policy   |  Terms of Use   |   Disclaimer   |   Sitemap

©2021 Ronjon Paul MD. All rights reserved.

DAY OF SURGERY INFORMATION

Edwards Hospital

Arrival & Directions

Drive to the South parking garage. Free Valet parking is available during business hours. If you self-park, take the elevator from the garage to the first floor to enter the main hospital lobby. Wheelchairs are available if needed. Take the D elevator to the 2nd floor. Proceed to the Surgical and Endoscopy Check-In Desk. Here you and your family will be checked in and escorted to the Pre-op Area to be prepared for surgery. Up to two family members may wait with you until you are taken to surgery. Your family may then wait in the Surgical Waiting room until notified by the surgeon that the surgery has been completed. A receptionist will take down contact information so that your family may be easily reached to speak with Dr. Paul. Complimentary coffee is available for your family while in the Surgical Waiting room. The cafeteria and gift shop are on the ground floor in the North area of the hospital and the coffee shop is in the South area of the hospital for your family’s convenience.

Get Directions to Edwards Hospital

In the preoperative room you will be prepared for surgery. The team will be checking your vital signs, starting your IV, validating your medications, health history, lab results and any follow up for additional testing needed. At this time, they will obtain your consent for surgery and answer any questions you may still have. Your anesthesiologist will see you and your family prior to your surgery. Dr. Paul, Adam or Kevin  will mark your surgical site. You will be escorted to the operating room by cart. Your family can wait in the surgical waiting room. Dr. Paul will call them when surgery is completed.  If he can not reach them, he will leave a message with the Patient Liaison. Following surgery you will be taken to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) where you will recover for an hour or more. During this time, pain and nausea control will be established and your vital signs will be monitored frequently.